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Kino Satoshi (b. 1987), Oroshi "Rasen"; Mountain Gust "Spiral"

Kino Satoshi (b. 1987)

Oroshi "Rasen"; Mountain Gust "Spiral"

2019

Glazed porcelain

9 7/8 x 16 1/8 x 14 1/8 in.

Inv# 11223

$ 9,750

Kino Satoshi (b. 1987), Oroshi "Rasen"; Mountain Gust "Spiral"

Kino Satoshi (b. 1987)

Oroshi "Rasen"; Mountain Gust "Spiral"

2019

Glazed porcelain

9 7/8 x 16 1/8 x 14 1/8 in.

Inv# 11223

$ 9,750

Kino Satoshi (b. 1987), Oroshi "Rasen"; Mountain Gust "Spiral"

Kino Satoshi (b. 1987)

Oroshi "Rasen"; Mountain Gust "Spiral"

2019

Glazed porcelain

9 7/8 x 16 1/8 x 14 1/8 in.

Inv# 11223

$ 9,750

Kino Satoshi (b. 1987), Oroshi "Rasen"; Mountain Gust "Spiral"

Kino Satoshi (b. 1987)

Oroshi "Rasen"; Mountain Gust "Spiral"

2019

Glazed porcelain

9 7/8 x 16 1/8 x 14 1/8 in.

Inv# 11223

$ 9,750

Kino Satoshi (b. 1987), Oroshi "Rasen"; Mountain Gust "Spiral"

Kino Satoshi (b. 1987)

Oroshi "Rasen"; Mountain Gust "Spiral"

2019

Glazed porcelain

9 7/8 x 16 1/8 x 14 1/8 in.

Inv# 11223

$ 9,750

description Kino

KINO SATOSHI (b. 1987)
Oroshi "Rasen"; Mountain Gust "Spiral"
2019
Seihakuji (bluish white-glazed) porcelain
9 7/8 x 16 1/8 x 14 1/8 in.

Potter’s mark:  Satoshi (incised underglaze on exterior)
Signature:        Kino Satoshi, Satoshi Kino (in romaji)
Seal:                Kino Satoshi

Initially attracted to stone as a medium for sculpture, Kino Satoshi became fascinated by the similar characteristics of fired porcelain, particularly in its strength and polished surface. Kino was born in Kyoto and had some experience with clay as a teenager, but it was after attending Kyoto Seika University and seeing the powerful porcelain sculptures of Nishida Jun (1977-2005) that he dedicated himself to porcelain. His curving, billowing sculptures seem to defy the stone-like strength of porcelain that he was so drawn to as a student. With a combination of throwing on a wheel and hand-building, Kino deftly exploits the qualities of porcelain to create his delicately balanced, dynamic ribbon sculptures that unravel and extend into space. He uses a translucent bluish-white (seihakuji) glaze, inspired by the moon, that further blurs the boundaries of the solid state and appears instead to materialize as wind or waves. 

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